Wednesday, July 30, 2014
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LIVING LEGACY: Lorraine Bradley, daughter of late iconic Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, this week announced her support for Wendy Greuel to continue her fathers legacy as mayor.  (Photo by Troy Tieuel for Sentinel)

 

Bradley Family Supports

Wendy Greuel for Mayor

Lorraine Bradley says the legacy of her father Tom Bradley

will be in good hands when Wendy Greuel is elected Mayor of L.A.

 

“When I see Wendy, I see a strong person,” said Lorraine Bradley, retired school teacher and daughter of the late Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley.

Lorraine Bradley recently announced her endorsement of Controller Wendy Greuel as the city’s next mayor, pointing to her “great leadership qualities” as one of the reasons.

“She learned from the best how to be a leader and what that entails,” she said.

“The best,” being her late father, who led the city for 20 years (from 1973 to 1993) and whose (as some have put it ) “accomplishments transcended his flaws.” One biographer wrote: “A man of quiet determination, Bradley spent a lifetime bridging racial barriers and used his skills to forge extraordinary coalitions, most notably between Blacks and Jews and between labor and business. He presided over a period of enormous growth in Los Angeles… Bradley also was key to the racial peace that the rapidly diversifying city enjoyed during most of his five-term hold on the mayor's office. He opened doors for minorities and women to serve on city commissions, to rise in the ranks of City Hall employees and to share in city contracts…”

As a young woman, Greuel had been a beneficiary to Tom Bradley’s brand of humanitarianism and basically grew up, said Lorraine, in her dad’s office.

“When he took office and became mayor, he involved a lot of people, mostly young people and trained them to become what they are now,” she recalled.

“That’s what he liked to do. He liked to take young people and let them be trained in the correct way so they could see how things functioned, then put them in so they could do it. They would learn. And then, they had the opportunity to choose what they wanted to be…”

Greuel served in Tom Bradley’s office for 10 years, mainly as his spokesperson to the City Council, various departments and Los Angeles residents. She left in 1993, the end of his term, to work for then President Bill Clinton as field operations officer for Southern California’s Housing and Urban Development (HUD) program. During that time, Greuel had been involved in job creation and homeownership projects, social services and economic development.

She served on Los Angeles’ City Council from 2003 to 2009, taking the job of controller in July that same year.

“All those years, [she was] a fighter, a go-getter, someone who was always in there pushing and trying to do the right thing,” Lorraine Bradley said.

“From the beginning when she came to work as a teenager for daddy, she had no idea what all of this entailed… what politics was about. Obviously over the many years she found out what politics was really about. And, yet she’s managed to work in private industry and come back to public [as a] councilperson, controller and knows what she wants to do and how she wants to help people, because my father was all about helping people. And if that wasn’t what you wanted to do and be involved in on a daily basis then you didn’t work for him.

“And so, she knows about working with people, to try to get them to solve problems. Because, you can’t work in a vacuum. You can’t solve problems unless you work with others.”

Her friendship with Greuel notwithstanding, Lorraine Bradley as a Los Angeles resident and voter said she wants the city’s next mayor to focus on generating more revenue here.

“Hopefully more of it will come to us so that programs that are so important to the city and to the people of the city will continue. I think more than anything that will be [Greuel’s] objective, to try to balance the budget so that people aren’t hurt. She knows what she needs to do. She’s the controller so she knows where the money is.”

 

WOMAN-TO-WOMAN: Powerful Congresswoman Maxine Waters (Right) joined City Controller Wendy Greuel (LEFT) at City Hall this week to pledge her public endorsement of Wendy Greuel for the first woman mayor of Los Angeles.

(Valerie Goodloe for Sentinel)

 

Maxine Waters Adds Woman Power for Greuel

Waters says Wendy Greuel is a woman of honesty and integrity


Six weeks from the most significant election for Los Angeles since the past two presidential elections, Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-43) has launched her support for Controller Wendy Greuel in the race for the next mayor of Los Angeles.

Waters is considered to be one of the most powerful women in American politics, having gained a reputation as a fearless and outspoken advocate for women, children, people of color and the poor.

Recently, Waters stood side by side with Greuel at City Hall, both wearing matching bright red jackets as the 12-term congresswoman made her endorsement of Greuel official.

“Wendy Greuel is a woman of honesty and integrity, someone with the leadership, experience and toughness to get Los Angeles back on track,” Waters said. “I have fought my whole career to empower Angelenos, and that’s exactly what Wendy will do as mayor. She’ll fight to grow our middle class and bring good jobs and opportunity to every part of the city, with special attention to the areas with the greatest needs. And she could make history by becoming Los Angeles’ first woman mayor. I’m proud to be a co-chair on her campaign, and I am excited to join Wendy’s efforts to reach out to voters across the city.”

The 37-year public servant who is iconic in the Black community will also be joining Greuel’s campaign as a co-chair and has pledged to do ‘whatever it takes’ to secure Greuel’s mayoral bid to become the first woman in city history to serve in that capacity.

Waters 43rd Congressional District includes a large part of South Los Angeles that has increasingly become a key battleground region for the two candidates.

As the ranking member of the House Committee on Financial Services and as co-chair on Greuel’s campaign, Waters will help lead outreach to African-Americans, Latinos, Asian Pacific Islanders and women throughout the city.

Waters also praised Greuel as a leader who will fight for equality and equal pay for women. Her endorsement comes the day before Equal Pay Day, which highlights the pay gap between men and women. Women continue to make just 77 cents for every dollar made by men. The disparity is even greater for women of color.

“Maxine Waters has dedicated her life to service. As one of the most powerful women in American politics and a tireless advocate for women, children, people of color and the poor, she’s fought her entire career fighting to bring economic opportunities to South Los Angeles,” Greuel said. “I’m proud to have her endorsement, and together we will partner to invest in jobs and job-training programs, spur economic development and support the creation of small businesses in Los Angeles so every Angeleno has an opportunity to succeed.”

The congresswoman joins prominent leaders including President Bill Clinton, Leader Nancy Pelosi, Supervisor Mark Ridley Thomas, West Angeles Church of God in Christ Bishop Charles E. Blake, basketball legend Earvin ‘Magic’ Johnson, The Rev. Cecil ‘Chip’ Murray and Sentinel Publisher Danny J. Bakewell Sr. in endorsing Greuel.

In addition to Greuel’s long tenure of being an advocate of the Black community, Rep. Waters is equally encouraged to support a woman of stellar credentials for the city’s high office.

It was Waters who was instrumental in the 2008 presidential campaign for Hillary Clinton. After a combative primary and subsequent loss to eventual President Barack Obama, she gave her full support to the Democratic ticket for president.

Waters has been on the cutting edge, tackling difficult and often controversial issues. She has combined her strong legislative and public policy acumen and high visibility in Democratic Party activities with an unusual ability to do grassroots organizing.

Prior to her election to the House of Representatives in 1990, Waters had already attracted national attention for her no-nonsense, no-holds-barred style of politics. During 14 years in the California State Assembly, she rose to the powerful position of Democratic Caucus Chair.

She was responsible for some of the boldest legislation California has ever seen: the largest divestment of state pension funds from South Africa; landmark affirmative action legislation; the nation’s first statewide Child Abuse Prevention Training Program; the prohibition of police strip searches for nonviolent misdemeanors; and the introduction of the nation’s first plant closure law.

Congresswoman Waters has long been highly visible in Democratic Party politics and has served on the Democratic National Committee (DNC) since 1980. She was a key leader in five presidential campaigns: Sen. Edward Kennedy (1980), Rev. Jesse Jackson (1984 & 1988), and President Bill Clinton (1992 & 1996). In 2001, she was instrumental in the DNC’s creation of the National Development and Voting Rights Institute and the appointment of Mayor Maynard Jackson as its chair.

 

 

 

 

 

Category: Local


 

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