Wednesday, July 23, 2014
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MONEY BEING MONEY: fresh faced Floyd ‘Money Mayweather is shown here following his brilliant victory over Canelo Alvarez to remain undefeated and arguably the best boxer in the history of the sport. Trey Waller for Sentinel

The sport of boxing may have run out of Mexicans to hitch to the Floyd ‘Money’ Mayweather cash register.

Its most recent victim was a 23-year old redhead with an artificial undefeated record, one built on beating taxi cab drivers in native Guadalajara, Jalisco Mexico and beating a couple of stumble bums in the states before landing a Mayweather payday.

Mayweather painted another masterpiece against Canelo Alvarez who was hailed as a Mexican hero, but became just to another zero in ‘Money’s forever swelling bank account.

For his Picasso, Mayweather cashed a $41.5 million check for eliminating red, white and green hope on Mexican Independence Day last Saturday at the MGM Grand Garden Arena.

 The best that can be said after another Mayweather artistic clubbing and mugging is that Saul ‘Canelo’ Alvarez sure as hell has a good chin on him.

It was a fight that many thought the 36-year old undefeated Mayweather could lose. Alvarez was listed as 7-2 to win the fight and 4-1 to knockout Mayweather.

In the end Alvarez had a better chance of catching Haley’s Comet than he did hitting Mayweather who didn’t just win the fight, but did so impressively that now it appears that he can never be beaten.

Improving his perfect record to 45-0 with just four fights remaining on his $200 million contract with CBS/Showtime, Mayweather is poised to finish his career as arguably the greatest of all-time.

Few will contest that he isn’t the greatest boxer in history. Joe Louis, Muhammad Ali and other prehistoric figures will get mentioned.

Measured by today’s capitalistic model Mayweather is the greatest of all time simply because he is also the most financially successful of all time.

He has already banked more $71.5 million in fight purses, making him the richest athlete in the world.

The persona that he projects is one of a brash, ego driven, money spending jock who admires fancy cars, sexy women and gambling.

However, those elements are mere marketing points to sell him to a public, which is fascinated by the lure of the glittering and gleaming lifestyle.

We live in an era of sagging pants, diamond rings and social media that brings all of this quickly to the forefront. Mayweather represents all of that.

Or, so it seems. Perhaps he just understands this reality TV crazed environment better than most and is hell bent on cashing in on it?

After all this is a man who after shattering pay per view records in a bout with Oscar De La Hoya that generated a record $200 million and 2.4 million buys, abruptly announced his retirement after the fight in 2007.

Then, subsequently returned in two months for a mega showdown against Britain’s Ricky Hatton in a battle of undefeated champions, but retired again during an emotionally charged post fight presser, but to come out of retirement after 21 months later to lend a beating to Juan Manuel Marquez in 2009.

Boxing promoter Don King, who has never promoted Mayweather but tried to secure his services hails him as “Modern day version of Muhammad Ali. The greatest fighter in the world.”

Mayweather’s former promoter Bob Arum predicted that ‘Money’ would easily out point Alvarez, although the two have been at odds for years.

“The fight is two years too soon for Alvarez. Floyd has way too much experience and I don’t see him losing,” Arum said before the fight.

Following his lopsided victory against Alvarez that was viewed by a worldwide pay per view audience that plucked down a record $75 bucks, a much more mild and mature Floyd ‘Money’ Mayweather emerged.

A man who is seemingly content with his place in boxing history and preparing to pass the torch.

"It's all about skills," Mayweather said.  "I came out tonight and showed my skills.  But a true champion like Canelo can take a loss and bounce back.

His grandmother Bernice Mayweather, four children Iyanna, Koraun, Jirah and Zion, his father Floyd Sr., promoter and advisor Leonard Ellerbe, flanked an unblemished, fresh-faced Mayweather at the dais.

As he carefully answered a volley of questions from the packed room of reporters, he casually said: “I am looking forward to going home and relax and take a vacation. I haven’t had a vacation in a while.”

He alluded to the many years when he did party hard and said that now he’s “what you call a homebody.”

Mayweather is a homebody with mansions in Miami, Los Angeles and his hometown of Las Vegas and a fleet of luxury cars at each one of them, but appears to be more inspired to provide for his kids after 17 years in the ring.

“I think I may have dislocated by elbow after about the fourth round and couldn’t throw the jab, but I looked over at my kids and said I can’t go out like this,” Mayweather said.

It was his second fight in 2013, a rarity in itself for him, but in both he sustain some sort of injury. Against Robert Guererro it was his brittle right hand.

Both are settle indications that that while his savvy craftsmanship is still just as polished, slight wear and tear might be building.

That still may not be enough of advantage that anyone can beat him in the ring. He’s better than most fighters with one hand than they are with two and the brilliance of his intellect is off the charts.

The next date for ‘Money’ is as he has called it, Cinco de Mayweather or the month of May 2014.

The build up of his next Mexican foe is about to begin.

Those satin headbands made famous by Julio Cesar Chavez are in production of their legion of fans.

They will come out in droves the root against Mayweather. He will be part of lifting them up and then and then dashing their hopes.

Boxing fans can begin the count down to the Money’ Final Four and when the door closes, Mayweather’s mansion of history will open. Perhaps then he will invite the greats to come in.

 

Category: News


 

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