Friday, August 29, 2014
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Two of the most closely watched propositions on the California Ballot this year have won. Voters opted to ban same sex marriage and to continue, albeit narrowly, to allow private abortions for minors. The two issues have been the topic of continuous debate.

Californians approved Proposition 22 in 2000, which confirmed only marriages between a man and a woman are valid here. But earlier this year, the state Supreme Court overturned that rule, deeming marriage limitations unconstitutional. Supporters of Prop 8, including the California Family Council, say same- sex couples can obtain similar benefits under domestic partnership laws but point to children not reared by a mother and father as being negatively "We don't see any of our institutions watching out for the rights of children so we are going to make sure that we do," said Sonja Brown, a spokeswoman for Yes on 8.

Opponents said the law is discriminatory and violates equality and privacy rights guaranteed by the state constitution. A number of same sex couples chose to marry quickly after the court's ruling in anticipation of Prop 8's victory.

Meanwhile, Proposition 4, which would require parental notification of an abortion performed on a minor, won a very narrow victory. Proponents said it would protect teenage girls from adult predators who sexually exploit teens only to take them secretly to get abortions.  But those against the initiative, which has also appeared on past ballots, say that proponents are jeopardizing the lives of young girls only to promote their political agenda.

Scared girls would take matters into their own hands, seeking "back alley" abortions and even contemplating suicide.

"This is the third attempt by anti-choice extremists to put the health of teens at risk in California," said Kathy Kneer of Planned Parenthood.

 

Category: Politics


 

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